Report of Committee

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The Honourable Mr˙ Lowndes reported from the Committee to whom the President' s Message of the 25th instant was referred; and he read the Report in his place, and afterwards delivered it at the Clerk' s table, where the same was read, and is as followeth:

"That subjecting prisoners of war to a state of slavery, independent of any consideration of the illegality of such a measure, would involve this State in many difficulties, obstruct and impede a future peace, give the Indians a precedent that may be fatal to those of our own people who may unfortunately fall into their hands, and prevent a mutual exchange of prisoners — an object of too much consequence to be put out of our power. That, in the opinion of the Committee, it is not advisable or proper to give any encouragement to the forces now acting against the Cherokee Indians to expect that the property of such Indians as may be taken prisoners should be vested in the captors, and be made slaves; but, on the contrary, that publick declarations should be made to prevent any such expectation. Your Committee, as an encouragement to those who shall distinguish themselves in the war against the Cherokees, recommended the following rewards: For every Indian man killed, and certificate thereof given by the commanding officer, and the scalp produced as an evidence thereof in Charles-Town, by the forces in the pay of this State, one hundred pounds currency; for every Indian man prisoner, one hundred and twenty-five pounds; for every other prisoner, one hundred and ten pounds."

Resolved, That the Report he taken into consideration immediately.

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The first and second clauses of the Report being read, were severally agreed to by the House.

The third clause being read, and a debate arising thereon, a motion was made that the reward for Indian men' s scalps should be seventy-five pounds. And, the question being put, the House divided — teller for the yeas, Colonel Pinckney, 48; teller for the nays, Major Cattell, 29. So it was resolved in the affirmative.

A motion was made that the reward for taking Indian men prisoners should be one hundred pounds. And, the question being put, resolved in the affirmative.

A motion was then made that the reward for every other prisoner should be one hundred pounds. And, the question being put, it passed in the negative.

A motion was made that the said reward should be ninety pounds. And, the question being put, that also passed in the negative.

A motion was then made that the said reward should be eighty pounds. And, the question being put, resolved in the affirmative.

And the Report, as amended and agreed to, is as followeth:

"That subjecting prisoners of war to a state of slavery, independent of any considerations of the illegality of such a measure, would involve this State in many difficulties, obstruct and impede a future peace, give the Indians a precedent that may be fatal to those of our own people who may unfortunately fall into their hands, and prevent a mutual exchange of prisoners — an object of too much consequence to be put out of our power. That, in the opinion of your Committee, it is not advisable or proper to give any encouragement to the forces now acting against the Cherokee Indians, to expect that the property of such Indians as may be taken prisoners should be vested in the captors, and be made slaves; but, on the contrary, that publick declarations should be made to prevent such expectations. Your Committee, as an encouragement to those who shall distinguish themselves in the war against the Cherokees, recommend the following rewards, to wit: For every Indian man killed, upon certificate thereupon given by the commanding officer, and the scalp produced as an evidence thereof in Charles-Town, by the forces in the pay of this State, seventy-five pounds currency; for every Indian man prisoner, one hundred pounds like money; for every other prisoner, eighty pounds like money."