Letter from the President of Congress to General Washington: The unhappy confusions in Pennsylvania have hitherto prevented the establishment of the Flying Camp; but things will now take a different turn, as the contest to keep possession of power is at an end, and a new mode of Government will soon be adopted

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PRESIDENT OF CONGRESS TO GENERAL WASHINGTON.

Philadelphia, July 4, 1776.

SIR: The enclosed resolves, to which I must beg leave to refer your attention, will inform you of the steps Congress have taken to establish the flying-camp. To the unhappy confusions that have prevailed in this Colony must principally be ascribed the delays that have hitherto attended that salutary measure. However, I flatter myself things will now take a different turn, as the contest to keep possession of power is now at an end, and a new mode of government, equal to the exigencies of our affairs, will soon be adopted, agreeably to the recommendation of Congress to the United Colonies.

I am directed to request you will appoint a proper officer for the command of the flying-camp, and persons to supply them with rations.

I have written to the several Committees, and have pressed them to send forward their troops with the utmost despatch.

I have the honour to be, sir, your most obedient and very humble servant,

JOHN HANCOCK, President.

To His Excellency General Washington, New-York.